Sara Gurpal’s Blue Choora Is The Ugliest Fashion Misfire!

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There are certain traditions and customs which we all swear by and adding ‘manpasand‘ changes to it can sometimes turn the whole feel of those rituals into a disaster.

Same is the case with Sara Gurpal’s blue choora which she is seen wearing in this picture:

sara-gurpal-blue-choora-ghaintpunjab.com

There might a few of you who could like this style but personally I hated it! I mean yaar je kise reet nu ages to iko jeha chalaya hoya then why mess around with it, especially in case of a sacred ceremony such as marriage.

Keeping the sanctity of a bridal ensemble intact is what vdde buzurg always tell their girls. Also, we really don’t want our fashionistas to be the ‘aa ki paya drama jahi ne‘ kinda bride!

Traditionally made of ivory, with inlay work, though now made with plastic, Choora is worn by a bride on her wedding day, especially during Hindu and Sikh weddings.

By the way for all those of you are unaware, here’s why a bride wears choora, according to syane:

As the choora is made of fragile material, Punjabi custom has it that the bride may refrain from heavy housework in her marital home to keep it intact for the 40 days. During the old is gold days, the bride would wear a chura for a full year. When the color started to fade, her in-laws would actually have it recolored, so everyone knows she was a newly wed (less than a year of marriage). On an auspicious Hindu holiday, usually sangrand, after the 1st anniversary her in-laws would hold a small intimate ceremony in which the chura was removed and glass churiyan (bangles) were placed on both hands. This usually was accompanied with mithai (Indian sweets) and a monetary shagun. The chura then was taken to a river and a prayer was said and it left to float onto the water.

The post Sara Gurpal’s Blue Choora Is The Ugliest Fashion Misfire! appeared first on Ghaint Punjab.

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